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Amazon Testing New Drones – New Limits on ISPs – Brain Implants Give Paralyzed Movement

Amazon Gets Permission to Test Drones

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has once again granted Amazon permission to test drones for commercial use, this time expediting the request. The FAA says Amazon can test drones for delivery as long as it limits altitude to 400 feet and speed to 100 miles per hour. Eventually, the web retailer hopes to use commercial drones to deliver packages to customers at a distance of 10 miles or more.

http://ti.me/1cTeCMe

Test shows if your ISP is throttling Internet speed

New regulations should stop ISPs from throttling your Internet, but has your ISP complied?

http://tnw.co/1PCWXKm

FCC Prepares to Become the Internet’s Privacy Cop

The agency issued an “enforcement advisory” Wednesday, outlining for the first time how it plans to decide whether to crack down on a company for violating its customers’ privacy. But the statement offers few specifics, leading critics to warn that the agency is claiming expansive new regulatory powers.

In order to enact net neutrality rules that it believed could hold up in court, the FCC expanded its power over Internet service by classifying it under the same regulatory regime as landline telephones.

That classification comes with dozens of regulations that have little to do with net neutrality. While the FCC waived most of those requirements for Internet providers, one section that will apply is the agency’s privacy protections.

http://bit.ly/1PCXs7a

Brain implants control robot arm well enough to grab a beer

A paralyzed man named Erik Sorto has finally been able to drink beer on his own after 13 years, and it’s all thanks to a robotic arm controlled solely by his mind.

Other mind-controlled robot limbs usually target the brain region that controls muscles, but the PPC is in charge of our “intent to move” instead. This apparently allows Caltech’s creation to move more fluidly and naturally, unlike the movements of similar technologies, which are (according to the team) “delayed and jerky.” In order to control the arm, Sorto has to think of what he intends to do, instead of imagining the details of a particular action. He has to think that he “wants to shake another person’s hand,” for instance, whereas other systems might require him to imagine each step: lift forearm, extend, grasp other person’s hand, lift up, down, up, down.

http://engt.co/1KqL4np

Doctors Say Tick Borne ‘Powassan Virus’ Is Worse Than Lyme Disease

It’s even worse than Lyme disease. Ticks in New York have been found to carry a rare, potentially life-threatening, virus.

http://cbsloc.al/1JJRvR6

OldNYC – Mapping historical pictures of New York City

New York City photos are now being currated online and organized by location and time. Take a walk down the old city streets.

http://bit.ly/1cblhR0

How the government just protected some of your favorite podcasts

The company that owns the patent in question, Personal Audio, says it invented podcasting. In 2013, it began going around to podcast-makers, threatening to take them to court unless they paid a licensing fee. Among those affected? TV personality and comedian Adam Carolla, who ultimately settled with Personal Audio but not before spending more than $650,000 defending himself.

If you’ve heard about this case or others like it, then you’re familiar with patent trolls. They are companies that own patents but don’t really use them to make anything, except lawsuits. Pretty much everyone agrees they’re a horrible drain on innovation and the economy; the Federal Trade Commission gave a slap on the wrist to one last year, and Congress is currently debating how to reduce their impact.

Friday’s ruling by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office invalidates five provisions of Personal Audio’s podcasting patent.

http://wapo.st/1HoIPKZ

The Most Creative Applications of 3D Printing

Beyond its recreational use, this promising technology already has very innovative and creative applications in fields as diverse as health, space exploration, education or art.

NASA plans to send 3D printers to space to allow astronauts to manufacture the parts they need.

For biology classes in high schools, or even for faculties of medicine, one can now print replicas of human body parts that help in their study. 3D printing may also be applied in the study of art or of human evolution. It is already possible to take a replica of Michelangelo’s David to the classroom to analyse, draw or manipulate.

http://bit.ly/1cTgh4r

Possible cure for Melanoma?

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. Among the various types of skin cancer, melanoma is the most severe. Melanoma develops in the cells of the skin that produce melanin, which is the pigment that gives skin its color. It accounts for over 76 percent of cancer deaths each year. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2015, about 73,870 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the United States.

So, what are the researchers in Utah doing? They are customizing mutated viruses and injecting them directly into melanoma tumors to “train” them to attack cancer cells. What’s unique about this study
though, is that they are not just taking any virus, but the herpes virus, and altering the way it works.

http://fxn.ws/1F7Lng2

Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away

Like fingerprints, every iris is unique — thanks to enormously complex patterns that remain the same throughout a person’s lifetime. High-resolution cameras can capture images of the iris from a distance using light in the near-infrared wavelength band.

In the realm of law enforcement, iris recognition could be used to identify suspects at long range in various lighting conditions. The system can even be used to capture images through reflections in a mirror.

http://bit.ly/1F7LEQa

Computer Scientist Gives Virginia Voting Machines F- Security Grade

The electronic voting machines were shown to fail in every category: firmware, software, physical security and auditability.

http://bit.ly/1JK0MZu

This Guy Couldn’t Get a Job at Best Buy, so He’s Refusing to Pay Back His For-Profit College Loans

At 28, Michael Adorno got fed up with his low-wage job at a pizzeria in Richmond Hill, Georgia, and decided to go to college. Adorno attended the for-profit Everest College, part of Corinthian Colleges Inc., in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 2010 to 2012, and he received an associate degree in network administration.

Three years later Adorno is unemployed and was even rejected from a job at Best Buy. Adorno belongs to a group called the Corinthian 100, alumni of Corinthian Colleges who refuse to pay back their student loans and claim they were defrauded by Corinthian. Like other members of the group, he claims he got a subpar education and was left with massive debt and no suitable job.

Before 2014, Corinthian Colleges Inc. was a network of more than 100 schools and one of the largest for-profit college companies in the U.S. But numerous investigations and lawsuits alleging wrongdoing against the company rapidly decreased its size. In July, an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education forced Corinthian to sell 85 of its schools and close another 12.

http://slate.me/1cTi5KI

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Social Media and Politics – Drone Follows You and Shoots – NSA Dragnet Went Too Far

Social Media is Changing the Nature of Political Campaigns

When social media is involved, politics can become a very dangerous game. When every speech, appearance, and remark can be recorded for posterity journalists tend to take advantage of that fact. As a result, politicians are becoming more guarded, and some are even using social media themselves to cut journalists off at the pass.

http://bit.ly/1IHFpHq

Throw This Drone in the Air and It Will Follow You Wherever You Go

Drones, or unmanned systems, are revolutionizing how we can take photos and videos. In fact, drones can take incredible footage in places that humans could never reach (like the mouth of an erupting volcano). This new drone called the Lily Camera is designed to follow you through GPS and capture footage wherever you go. Just throw it up in the air to get started.

http://bit.ly/1IGqEol

Warrantless Snooping Goes Far Beyond the NSA’s Phone-Record Dragnet

The Fourth Amendment prohibits “unreasonable searches and seizures” of our “persons, houses, papers, and effects.” But according to the Supreme Court, the Fourth Amendment does not protect our papers once we entrust them to someone else.

The dubious “third-party doctrine,” enunciated before the Internet existed and mobile phones became ubiquitous, was crucial to the outcome of a case decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit last week. The court said an armed robber named Quartavius Davis had no constitutional grounds to object when the FBI linked him to several crime scenes with cellphone location data that it obtained without a probable-cause warrant.

The court’s logic was straightforward: Those records did not belong to Davis; they belonged to MetroPCS, his mobile phone company. So even though they revealed everywhere he went over the course of 67 days, he had no reasonable expectation that the information would remain private.

That means the government can find out what we watch on YouTube, what we look up on Wikipedia, what we buy on Amazon, and whom we “friend” on Facebook or date via Match.com—”all without a warrant.” In fact, Martin noted, “the government could ask ‘cloud’-based file-sharing services like Dropbox or Apple’s iCloud for all the files we relinquish to their servers,” said dissenting Judge Beverly Martin.

http://bit.ly/1IGrRvN

Video Is About to Become the Way We All Visit the Doctor

http://wrd.cm/1Fk8SWN

Is your BEDROOM making you fat?

Study: Being exposed to too much artificial light could be making us fat

  • Mice exposed to light 24 hours a day for 5 weeks put on 50% more fat
  • Constant light disrupts the body clock and slows down calorie-burning
  • Experts said: ‘The importance of dark is greatly under-appreciated’

http://dailym.ai/1KT2RjN

Airport Security Advances Clash With Privacy Issues

At Northeastern University they are developing a security system that no one even knows is there. It tracks all your movements in the airport, detects people going the wrong way and even records your face, clothing, size, etc. so TSA can track you down.

http://nyti.ms/1cEXVnq

The CHIP Is A $9 Computer That Can Almost Do It All

What would you do with a $9 computer? Engineers and inventors will
be able to make their dreams come to life for the lowest price ever.

http://tcrn.ch/1JOaY0K

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Autonomous Truck – Microsoft Ditching Internet Explorer – Perfect Remote Working Setup

Autonomous Truck Crosses Hoover Dam

Automaker Daimler introduced an autonomous truck on Tuesday night. The company says a driver must be present, but that driver has the option to relinquish control to the vehicle.

http://wapo.st/1GUCo20

Microsoft is tossing Internet Explorer this fall. Is its replacement any better?

Well, the good news is, this browser isn’t Internet Explorer. If you’re a hardcore Chrome or Firefox user with a half dozen extensions, you probably won’t be tempted away immediately. For now, though, it does look promising. Microsoft is making an effort to add genuinely useful features to a browser that’s shedding its worst parts and starting over on a solid foundation.

http://bit.ly/1H4Gpni

Anti-Kardashian Pollution App

Tired of Kim Kardashian trying to break the Internet? Then break free of any Kardashian-related news with KardBlock, a new app that erases any mention of the family famous for being famous from your web browsing experience.

“If there’s anything on your newsfeed, the website you’re on, whatever, we simply make it disappear,” developer James Shamsi explains in a beta launch for the AdBlock program created to erase the Kardashians. “You won’t ever know the stories about the Kardashians are there, because you won’t ever see them.”

http://bit.ly/1JVjNJA

Paying for Social Is Better Than ‘Doing’ Social Media Yourself

Social networks are showing signs of decreased reach. None losing more rapidly than Facebook. There are two widely cited reasons for it: 1) Social media sites want to encourage businesses to pay them money for the value they now get for free; and 2) As more people and businesses post to social media more often, everyone gets less attention, so supply and demand push reach down and rates up.

http://bit.ly/1PvQxHA

NSA’s Bulk Collection Of Americans’ Phone Data Is Illegal, Appeals Court Rules

The National Security Agency’s practice of collecting data about Americans’ telephone calls in bulk goes beyond what Congress intended when it wrote Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel punted on the constitutional claim, deciding the program was simply not authorized by federal law.

One of the big reasons it is hard to discern congressional intent in this case, the court wrote, is that the bulk collection program has been shrouded in secrecy. So it cannot “reasonably be said” that Congress OK’d “a program of which many members of Congress — and all members of the public — were not aware.”

http://n.pr/1EW77xB

How to Find the Perfect Remote Working Setup for You

Remote working doesn’t suit everyone, but for those who do love the extra flexibility and autonomy, here is the where, when, why, and how of finding your perfect remote working setup.

http://bit.ly/1H7IbGR

Recruiting for “digital natives” is age discrimination, lawyers say.

How do you recruit for youthful workers? How about just recruiting for “digital natives”?

“Young people are just smarter,” Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, famously said on a conference stage in 2007 when he was 22. In 2013, Facebook settled a lawsuit with California’s Fair Employment and Housing Department for posting an employment ad that stated “Class of 2007 or 2008 preferred.”

Apple, Yahoo, Dropbox, and video game maker Electronic Arts all have listed openings with “new grad” as a preference.

http://for.tn/1FaT3Ub

FCC Commissioner: Feds May Come for Drudge

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) member Ajit Pai said over the weekend that he foresees a future in which federal regulators will seek to regulate websites based on political content, using the power of the FCC or Federal Elections Commission (FEC). He also revealed that his opposition to “net neutrality” regulations had resulted in personal harassment and threats to his family.

“It is conceivable to me to see the government saying, ‘We think the Drudge Report is having a disproportionate effect on our political discourse. He doesn’t have to file anything with the FEC. The FCC doesn’t have the ability to regulate anything he says, and we want to start tamping down on websites like that.’”

http://bit.ly/1JVlx5t

Apple to Push Paid Streaming Music Service With Free Trials and SoundCloud-Like Sharing

Ahead of the rumored debut of Apple’s upcoming streaming music service, Re/code has shared several details on the initiative, sourced from industry insiders. As we’ve learned previously, Apple will charge $9.99 per month for the service and will not offer a freemium streaming tier as other music services like Spotify do, but the company is aiming to introduce ways to let people listen to come content for free. First and foremost, Apple hopes to offer listeners a free trial period

http://bit.ly/1cxpKP7

Pizza Hut App anyone? Woman held hostage asks for help in online pizza order

A quick-thinking Highlands County woman saved herself and her children from possible harm when she ordered an online pizza with a secret message saying she was being held hostage.

“We’ve never seen that before,” the restaurant’s manager, Candy Hamilton, said. “I’ve been here 28 years and never, never seen nothing like that come through.”

http://bit.ly/1FUMynb

Mobile Search Queries Start to Surpass Desktop: Here’s What You Can Do About It

Now that mobile search queries have surpassed desktop queries, the business implication of the mobile algorithm update has become that much clearer: If you’re still thinking of mobile as a secondary priority, your business’ online presence will start to suffer. As Dischler says, “The future of mobile is now.”

http://bit.ly/1F4Tqh7

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Welcome to the New, Slow Internet

net_neutrality_handcuffedThe FCC is from the government and they’re here to help with your slow, sub-standard, unfair internet.

Welcome the Internet to the speed of regulation, denying millions of Americans the full potential of innovation and unfettered access. It’s now controlled and managed by a government that can’t even launch a functional ObamaCare website, an FCC whose website can’t even handle the simple task of accurately recording public comments, and an IRS that loses emails.

FCC interference in the Internet marketplace will hurt the very consumers proponents claim to protect. In most cases, net neutrality rules are either unnecessary or will limit innovative business practices by smaller firms, rather than abuses by Internet Service Providers. Even worse, the rules shift additional costs back to consumers and away from companies through bans on sponsored-data plans and other pro-consumer practices.

Left-Wing Funded Lobbying

Left-wing Ford Foundation and George Soros’s Open Society Foundation have provided financial assistance to groups supporting the Obama administration’s “net neutrality” agenda, donating $196 million and at least five individuals from these groups have ascended to key positions at the White House and FCC, according to a new report.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said the Internet was “simply too important to be left without rules and a referee on the field.” In contrast, Republican FCC commissioner Ajit Pai, a vocal critic of the plan and one of the votes against it, said the FCC was “turning its back on Internet” because “President Obama told us to do so,” back in October, 2014.

Media Coverage?

The Media Research Center found that broadcast news networks spent only three minutes, 38 seconds covering Obama’s proposal in nearly three months of coverage following his announcement, despite the plan’s major implications for free speech and the economy.

What About Taxes?

The Internet Tax Freedom Act bans taxes on Internet access, although that bill expires in October. While Congress is expected to renew that legislation, it’s conceivable that states could eventually push Congress for the ability to tax Internet service now that it has been deemed a vital public utility.

“Read my lips. More Internet taxes are coming. It’s just a matter of when,” FCC Commissioner Pai said.

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Show Notes With Jack Heath – February 2nd, 2015

Looking for a cheap tablet?

How about an $84 Amazon Fire HD? The Fire HD 6 goes anywhere with its pocketable design–featuring a beautiful 6″ HD display,  unsurpassed reliability in its class. Watch movies, read books, download Apps. It’s a full Android tablet.

http://bit.ly/1zMvD4I

Bill Gates is worried about artificial intelligence too.

He has a warning for humanity: Beware of artificial intelligence in
the coming decades, before it’s too late.

IBM’s Watson supercomputer has moved on from besting Jeopardy
contestants to conducting medical research and diagnosis, and
researchers earlier this month detailed a new computer program that
can beat anyone at poker.

Musk in October called AI development “summoning the demon,” and
has invested in the space to keep his eye on it.

http://cnet.co/165sijA

Expect Faster Internet

If your ISP doesn’t provide download speeds
of 25Mbps, it can no longer tell you you’re getting broadband
internet.

The Federal Communications Commission has just voted to change the
definition of “broadband”, raising the minimum download speed from
4Mbps to 25Mbps and the minimum upload speed from 1Mbps to 3Mbps.

http://bit.ly/1wVZ7We

Right to Be Forgotten in Europe is Extending Worldwide

Europe’s highest court ruled that anyone with connections to Europe could
ask that links about themselves be removed from search results.

A judge ordered Google’s French subsidiary to pay daily fines of
roughly $1,100 until links to the defamatory content were removed
from all searches worldwide.

http://nyti.ms/1Aii7Wj

Movie Making With an iPhone 5S

How one of the best films at Sundance was shot using an iPhone
5S. Add a steadycam rig, a special lens and a lot of post-editing
work and you’ve got a real movie.

http://bit.ly/1Aijswe

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