Tag Archives: Microsoft

Is WiFi Dangerous to Your Health? Live on America Now With Andy Dean at 8:35

I’ll be on America Now at 8:35 tonight talking about WiFi and other wireless safety. Looks like as many as 4% of the population may be sensitive to the radio waves emitted by our cell phones, WiFi, Smart Meters and even our cars.

‘I used to be sick all the time’: Dozens of Americans who claim to be allergic to electromagnetic signals settle in small West Virginia town where WiFi is banned

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2576848/I-used-sick-time-Dozens-Americans-claim-allergic-electromagnetic-signals-settle-small-West-Virginia-town-WiFi-banned.html

 

How to Protect Your Windows XP Investment Well Past Microsoft’s Drop Dead Date

My Windows XP Computer

Turns out that Windows XP is going to supported well into 2015 – but only if you’re talking about your internet browser. And we’re not talking about Microsoft Internet Explorer, either.

Google has announced that it is going to be supporting Google Chrome for Windows XP past Microsoft’s 2014 dropdead date. This means that people who are using windows XP should not only switch over to Google’s chrome browser immediately, but it should extend the life of your Windows XP for at least a year beyond what Microsoft is planning on doing.

For those of you who are looking for an even better solution for your Windows XP machines, you might consider putting a specialized firewall and filter in front of your XP machines. These devices allow you to filter all of the Internet traffic coming from and going to your Windows machine, and remove known viruses, aware, spyware, etc. These types of specialized firewalls and filters should extend Windows XP’s life far beyond 2015.

I’ve created just such  specialized firewall/filter for the Healthcare industry before. Using some of the technologies available in various BSD distributions of UNIX, I’ve been able to place filters such as Squid into the data stream and have been able to protect everything from VMS servers, old Windows, Solaris, Linux and UNIX machines, and even modern operating systems from hundreds of thousands of attacks.

As always it, if you have any questions, please feel free to ask. Otherwise, the implementation is left as an exercise to the reader. :-)

iOS 7′s iTunes Radio a Huge Challenge for Pandora

English: The icon used on iTunes for the app

Pandora named former Microsoft executive Brian McAndrews as their new CEO today, just as Apple is launched their competing iTunes Radio service today. And since iTunes Radio will be built into iTunes, the service will be in the hands of practically every one of those users come September 18th.

Pandora has been gathering info since 2000 on the listening habits and preferences of its users, and relies on the Music Genome Project to help custom tailor its recommendations.   Apple however has the purchase history of every iTunes user at its disposal, not to mention a few years of data now from its “Genius” playlist feature that’s been quietly monitoring playback habits.

If you do want to remove ads, however, a year of Pandora One will cost you $36. iTunes Radio seems to have a similar set up, with free ad-supported streaming and no listening cap.   However, a year of ad-less iTunes Radio will be only $24.99 (no doubt priced directly to undercut Pandora), and will include a year of iTunes Match service which backs-up a user’s iTunes library to the cloud and allows streaming access (even for songs you didn’t purchase from iTunes).

You can be sure that Pandora won’t sit idly by as iTunes Radio begins to gain popularity, and a new challenger will hopefully drive innovation among these services.   All the advantages above also won’t mean anything if the taste-matching ability of iTunes Radio isn’t up to par, although based on this early review from Fast Times, it seems Pandora has legitimate reason for concern.

 

5 Minutes Without Google Drops Web Traffic 40 Percent

Google Fail Whale

GLOBAL INTERNET TRAFFIC dipped by 40 percent over the weekend when Google experienced a complete blackout, web analytics firms have claimed.

All of Google’s services including Search, Gmail and Youtube went down briefly during the blackout on Friday evening, leaving users in the dark and unable to access them for what the firm’s Apps Status Dashboard claimed was between one and five minutes.

A message on the Google Apps Dashboard at the time said that all of its services were hit.

Another message appeared later, which read, “Between 15:51 and 15:52 PDT, 50 to 70 percent of requests to Google received errors; service was mostly restored one minute later, and entirely restored after four minutes.”

Although the internet giant was down for less than five minutes, it seems that the internet as a whole suffered greatly as a result.

“This had a huge effect in the number of pageviews coming into [our] real-time tracking – around a 40 percent drop, as this graph of our global pageviews per minute shows,” web analytics firm Gosquared said.

However, the plunge in internet traffic also perhaps shows the ubiquity of Google as a primary internet source and the unpopularity of its competitors such as Bing, which were unable to pick up the slack during the outage.