Netflix Popularity/TV Down – Apple Research Kit Good, Bad and Evil – Show Notes for March 14, 2015

Americans are moving faster than ever away from traditional TV

More homes have turned to online video with 40 percent of U.S. homes subscribing to a streaming service such as Netflix, Amazon Instant Video or Hulu.

http://buff.ly/19jzevG

Netflix is now in 36% of homes across the United States

Nielsen’s 2014 Total Audience Report confirms what many already assumed: Americans are becoming more enamored with streaming services like Netflix and Hulu.

http://buff.ly/1EKWQq8

New-Age Bootstrapping Is Not A Money Problem, It’s A Product Opportunity

The tendency for entrepreneurs is to build big products. The problem with big, feature-rich products is that they take substantial time and money.

http://buff.ly/1CfKmF3

Stanford’s ResearchKit app gained more users in 24 hours than most medical studies find in a year

At least a few thousand people are interested enough in Apple’s new ResearchKit framework to participate in a medical study.

http://buff.ly/1EkmkIa

Apple’s Researchkit Could Be Gold Mine for Hackers

Apple earlier this week announced ResearchKit, an open source framework that will let medical and health researchers gather data through iPhone apps. ResearchKit will be released in April. Millions of users provide a huge attractor.

http://buff.ly/1HTdfHl

Cortana Could Edge Out Siri, Google Now

Microsoft later this year will offer its Cortana personal assistant as a standalone app for iOS and Android devices. The engine behind Cortana is “arguably better than [Siri or Google Now]”

http://buff.ly/1G2KlmT

State Department announces temporary computer system outage

The State Department announced a temporary outage Friday to upgrade its computer system. A statement from Jen Psaki, the department’s spokeswoman, announced the “short, planned outage” as a means…

http://buff.ly/1HTdxOy

Show Notes – Air Traffic Control – Goodbye to Apple and Microsoft – Apple Project Titan

Why 40-Year-Old Tech Is Still Running America’s Air Traffic Control

At any given time, around 7,000 aircraft are flying over the United States. For the past 40 years, the same computer system has controlled all that high-altitude traffic—a relic of the 1970s known as Host. The core system predates the advent of the Global Positioning System, so Host uses point-to-point, ground-based radar. Every day, thousands of travelers switch their GPS-enabled smartphones to airplane mode while their flights are guided by technology that predates the Speak & Spell.

http://wrd.cm/1M09XV9

Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft

I can use Linux, and I can get my work done well. I can play games. I can surf endlessly. The platform alternatives have reached a stage where they’re capable of handling just about everything I need.

More important, I’ve moved to these alternative platforms because I’ve changed my mind about the politics of technology. I now believe it’s essential to embed my instincts and values, to a greater and greater extent, in the technology I use. Those values start with a basic notion: We are losing control over the tools that once promised equal opportunity in speech and innovation—and this has to stop.

http://bit.ly/1ACLkKl

Apple’s ‘Project Titan’ could reshape the auto world

Detroit had a good year in 2014, selling 16.5 million autos — up 1 million from 2013. The stock of Ford and GM has revved on the good news, jumping 5.7 and 7.8 percent, respectively, in 2015.

Currently, at a secret location near its Cupertino, Calif., headquarters, Apple is said to be working on a car design — code-named “Project Titan” — at breakneck speed. While auto companies can take as long as seven years to develop a car, Apple is said to be hoping to start shipping its vehicles in five years — as early as 2020.

Well, Apple has been offering the best and the brightest in the car-battery field $250,000 signing bonuses plus salaries 60 percent higher than what they currently earn, Musk told Bloomberg Businessweek this month.

http://bit.ly/1LSjGNb

The Government’s War on Freedom of the Press – US Ranks 49th on Press Freedom Index

The U.S. plummeted to a dismal 49th place on the Reporters Without Borders annual Press Freedom Index, marking the country’s second lowest ranking since the list was created in 2002 and its lowest since 2006. Other countries ranked in the 40s and 50s include Haiti, Mongolia, and Chile.

Since the Obama Administration took power, it has used the Espionage Act to prosecute data leakers a record seven times—more than every other president combined in the law’s nearly 100-year history—a Fox News journalist has been spied on by the Justice Department under the justification that he’s a criminal conspirator, Wikileaks creator Julian Assange has been declared “a hi-tech terrorist,” and the Supreme Court refused to overturn a lower court ruling against Risen stating that the First Amendment doesn’t protect him from refusing to testify about a whistleblower that allegedly leaked classified information about the CIA’s efforts to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program.

http://bit.ly/1LOLRwv

Is WiFi Dangerous to Your Health? Live on America Now With Andy Dean at 8:35

I’ll be on America Now at 8:35 tonight talking about WiFi and other wireless safety. Looks like as many as 4% of the population may be sensitive to the radio waves emitted by our cell phones, WiFi, Smart Meters and even our cars.

‘I used to be sick all the time': Dozens of Americans who claim to be allergic to electromagnetic signals settle in small West Virginia town where WiFi is banned

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2576848/I-used-sick-time-Dozens-Americans-claim-allergic-electromagnetic-signals-settle-small-West-Virginia-town-WiFi-banned.html

 

How to Protect Your Windows XP Investment Well Past Microsoft’s Drop Dead Date

My Windows XP Computer

Turns out that Windows XP is going to supported well into 2015 – but only if you’re talking about your internet browser. And we’re not talking about Microsoft Internet Explorer, either.

Google has announced that it is going to be supporting Google Chrome for Windows XP past Microsoft’s 2014 dropdead date. This means that people who are using windows XP should not only switch over to Google’s chrome browser immediately, but it should extend the life of your Windows XP for at least a year beyond what Microsoft is planning on doing.

For those of you who are looking for an even better solution for your Windows XP machines, you might consider putting a specialized firewall and filter in front of your XP machines. These devices allow you to filter all of the Internet traffic coming from and going to your Windows machine, and remove known viruses, aware, spyware, etc. These types of specialized firewalls and filters should extend Windows XP’s life far beyond 2015.

I’ve created just such  specialized firewall/filter for the Healthcare industry before. Using some of the technologies available in various BSD distributions of UNIX, I’ve been able to place filters such as Squid into the data stream and have been able to protect everything from VMS servers, old Windows, Solaris, Linux and UNIX machines, and even modern operating systems from hundreds of thousands of attacks.

As always it, if you have any questions, please feel free to ask. Otherwise, the implementation is left as an exercise to the reader. :-)

iOS 7’s iTunes Radio a Huge Challenge for Pandora

English: The icon used on iTunes for the app

Pandora named former Microsoft executive Brian McAndrews as their new CEO today, just as Apple is launched their competing iTunes Radio service today. And since iTunes Radio will be built into iTunes, the service will be in the hands of practically every one of those users come September 18th.

Pandora has been gathering info since 2000 on the listening habits and preferences of its users, and relies on the Music Genome Project to help custom tailor its recommendations.   Apple however has the purchase history of every iTunes user at its disposal, not to mention a few years of data now from its “Genius” playlist feature that’s been quietly monitoring playback habits.

If you do want to remove ads, however, a year of Pandora One will cost you $36. iTunes Radio seems to have a similar set up, with free ad-supported streaming and no listening cap.   However, a year of ad-less iTunes Radio will be only $24.99 (no doubt priced directly to undercut Pandora), and will include a year of iTunes Match service which backs-up a user’s iTunes library to the cloud and allows streaming access (even for songs you didn’t purchase from iTunes).

You can be sure that Pandora won’t sit idly by as iTunes Radio begins to gain popularity, and a new challenger will hopefully drive innovation among these services.   All the advantages above also won’t mean anything if the taste-matching ability of iTunes Radio isn’t up to par, although based on this early review from Fast Times, it seems Pandora has legitimate reason for concern.