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Robert Beatty
VP of Technology, Cujo

Cyber security and identity theft have been in the news, and it seems that every day we hear about another hack, wouldn’t it be great if we could have “business level security for all our devices?

Well at CES 2016 Craig got to chat with Robert Beatty the VP of Technology at CUJO who makes a gateway device that inspects all our data entering in or leaving your network to block any threats before they cause any damage. It works by adapting and reacting to threats and does not just rely on known malware databases. Their self learning technology watches over all your connected devices and constantly updates itself to block new threats.

More information about Cujo below, and keep listening to Craig Peterson’s Tech Talk.

 

 

Robert Beatty is the Vice President of Technology for CUJO, a plug-and-play, smart home security device that protects the connected home from the latest and most-sophisticated virtual intrusions such as malware, viruses and hacking techniques.

With 11 years of experience as a software engineer, seven specific to the security industry, Robert’s innovative approach to internet security paves the way for CUJO to remain one step ahead of hackers and other virtual intrusions. Specializing in threat management technology, he works closely with security researchers, using their findings to create tools that neutralize cyber-attacks for both home and enterprise-level networks.

Cujo, the device that promises ‘business level’ security for all your home devices, took the crowdfunding world by storm this year and is now ready to be debuted at CES! I invite you to meet with the founders of CUJO for a 30-minute meeting to see the device in action. The Cujo booth is in the Smart Home Section (Booth 80531). Please read more about why this product will be the answer to the smart-home device that protects against hacks.

The holidays are here and every home owners worst nightmare is to deal with cyber security and identity theft. According to Future Crimes, nearly 20 percent of Americans have been victims of personal identity theft. Once bad hackers compromise your connected devices, they are free to steal your bank info, tax records, and other financial data. Hacking cameras (including baby monitors and cell phones) is so easy that some websites stream these hacks live. From scaring your kids, to taking pictures of us and planning robberies, our home privacy is exposed.

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