Alzheimers-Medical

Video Games and Alzheimer’s Risk – FBI Admits Patriot Act Didn’t Crack Any Cases – Perfect Vision

Playing Certain Video Games Increases Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Millions of boys could be at increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other mental illnesses in later life through playing action video games such as Call of Duty or Assassin’s Creed, according to new research.

Scientists say players navigate the screen using a key area of the brain called the caudate nucleus, which leads to loss of grey matter in the hippocampus.

The researchers said people across the world now spend three billion hours a week playing video games, and it is estimated the average young person will now have clocked up almost 10,000 hours by the time they are 21. But the effect of intense gaming on the brain are just beginning to emerge.

http://bit.ly/1BVf2I3

FBI admits Patriot Act snooping powers didn’t crack any major terrorism cases

Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz said that between 2004 and 2009, the FBI tripled its use of bulk collection under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which allows government agents to compel businesses to turn over records and documents, and increasingly scooped up records of Americans who had no ties to official terrorism investigations.

“The agents we interviewed did not identify any major case developments that resulted from use of the records obtained in response to Section 215 orders,” the inspector general concluded — though he said agents did view the material they gathered as “valuable” in developing other leads or corroborating information.

http://bit.ly/1QjWhdd

Bionic Lens Could Give Everybody Better-than-Perfect Vision

A optometrist has invented an artificial lens that he says not only corrects a patient’s sight, but offers a level of clarity three times greater than natural 20/20 vision.

Webb said arrangements for clinical trials on animals and blind patients were already underway. He expects the product to become commercially available within two years.

http://ti.me/1drOica

NSA Planned to Hijack Google App Store to Hack Smartphones

The National Security Agency and its closest allies planned to hijack data links to Google and Samsung app stores to infect smartphones with spyware, a top-secret document reveals.

The newly published document shows how the agencies wanted to “exploit” app store servers — using them to launch so-called “man-in-the-middle” attacks to infect phones with the implants. In this instance, the method would have allowed the surveillance agencies to modify the content of data packets passing between targeted smartphones and the app servers while an app was being downloaded or updated, inserting spyware that would be covertly sent to the phones.

http://bit.ly/1QjZ4D7

The new iOS 9 is more intelligent

Here are 5 other improvements coming to iPhones with iOS 9:

  • Siri will be 40% more accurate and 40% quicker, Apple says.
  • The Calendar app will estimate travel time to your next appointment
    based on traffic data and give you a nudge when it thinks it’s time
    to leave.
  • While reading an article that you want to come back to later, you
    can ask Siri to remind you to finish the piece later.
  • If you get a call from an unknown number, your iPhone can scan your
    email for the number to try guessing who’s looking to reach you.
  • When connecting a pair of headphones, your iPhone will
    automatically suggest some music to play.

http://ti.me/1QjZNUV

Print Friendly
amazon-drone_jpg__1200×619

Amazon Testing New Drones – New Limits on ISPs – Brain Implants Give Paralyzed Movement

Amazon Gets Permission to Test Drones

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has once again granted Amazon permission to test drones for commercial use, this time expediting the request. The FAA says Amazon can test drones for delivery as long as it limits altitude to 400 feet and speed to 100 miles per hour. Eventually, the web retailer hopes to use commercial drones to deliver packages to customers at a distance of 10 miles or more.

http://ti.me/1cTeCMe

Test shows if your ISP is throttling Internet speed

New regulations should stop ISPs from throttling your Internet, but has your ISP complied?

http://tnw.co/1PCWXKm

FCC Prepares to Become the Internet’s Privacy Cop

The agency issued an “enforcement advisory” Wednesday, outlining for the first time how it plans to decide whether to crack down on a company for violating its customers’ privacy. But the statement offers few specifics, leading critics to warn that the agency is claiming expansive new regulatory powers.

In order to enact net neutrality rules that it believed could hold up in court, the FCC expanded its power over Internet service by classifying it under the same regulatory regime as landline telephones.

That classification comes with dozens of regulations that have little to do with net neutrality. While the FCC waived most of those requirements for Internet providers, one section that will apply is the agency’s privacy protections.

http://bit.ly/1PCXs7a

Brain implants control robot arm well enough to grab a beer

A paralyzed man named Erik Sorto has finally been able to drink beer on his own after 13 years, and it’s all thanks to a robotic arm controlled solely by his mind.

Other mind-controlled robot limbs usually target the brain region that controls muscles, but the PPC is in charge of our “intent to move” instead. This apparently allows Caltech’s creation to move more fluidly and naturally, unlike the movements of similar technologies, which are (according to the team) “delayed and jerky.” In order to control the arm, Sorto has to think of what he intends to do, instead of imagining the details of a particular action. He has to think that he “wants to shake another person’s hand,” for instance, whereas other systems might require him to imagine each step: lift forearm, extend, grasp other person’s hand, lift up, down, up, down.

http://engt.co/1KqL4np

Doctors Say Tick Borne ‘Powassan Virus’ Is Worse Than Lyme Disease

It’s even worse than Lyme disease. Ticks in New York have been found to carry a rare, potentially life-threatening, virus.

http://cbsloc.al/1JJRvR6

OldNYC – Mapping historical pictures of New York City

New York City photos are now being currated online and organized by location and time. Take a walk down the old city streets.

http://bit.ly/1cblhR0

How the government just protected some of your favorite podcasts

The company that owns the patent in question, Personal Audio, says it invented podcasting. In 2013, it began going around to podcast-makers, threatening to take them to court unless they paid a licensing fee. Among those affected? TV personality and comedian Adam Carolla, who ultimately settled with Personal Audio but not before spending more than $650,000 defending himself.

If you’ve heard about this case or others like it, then you’re familiar with patent trolls. They are companies that own patents but don’t really use them to make anything, except lawsuits. Pretty much everyone agrees they’re a horrible drain on innovation and the economy; the Federal Trade Commission gave a slap on the wrist to one last year, and Congress is currently debating how to reduce their impact.

Friday’s ruling by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office invalidates five provisions of Personal Audio’s podcasting patent.

http://wapo.st/1HoIPKZ

The Most Creative Applications of 3D Printing

Beyond its recreational use, this promising technology already has very innovative and creative applications in fields as diverse as health, space exploration, education or art.

NASA plans to send 3D printers to space to allow astronauts to manufacture the parts they need.

For biology classes in high schools, or even for faculties of medicine, one can now print replicas of human body parts that help in their study. 3D printing may also be applied in the study of art or of human evolution. It is already possible to take a replica of Michelangelo’s David to the classroom to analyse, draw or manipulate.

http://bit.ly/1cTgh4r

Possible cure for Melanoma?

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. Among the various types of skin cancer, melanoma is the most severe. Melanoma develops in the cells of the skin that produce melanin, which is the pigment that gives skin its color. It accounts for over 76 percent of cancer deaths each year. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2015, about 73,870 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the United States.

So, what are the researchers in Utah doing? They are customizing mutated viruses and injecting them directly into melanoma tumors to “train” them to attack cancer cells. What’s unique about this study
though, is that they are not just taking any virus, but the herpes virus, and altering the way it works.

http://fxn.ws/1F7Lng2

Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away

Like fingerprints, every iris is unique — thanks to enormously complex patterns that remain the same throughout a person’s lifetime. High-resolution cameras can capture images of the iris from a distance using light in the near-infrared wavelength band.

In the realm of law enforcement, iris recognition could be used to identify suspects at long range in various lighting conditions. The system can even be used to capture images through reflections in a mirror.

http://bit.ly/1F7LEQa

Computer Scientist Gives Virginia Voting Machines F- Security Grade

The electronic voting machines were shown to fail in every category: firmware, software, physical security and auditability.

http://bit.ly/1JK0MZu

This Guy Couldn’t Get a Job at Best Buy, so He’s Refusing to Pay Back His For-Profit College Loans

At 28, Michael Adorno got fed up with his low-wage job at a pizzeria in Richmond Hill, Georgia, and decided to go to college. Adorno attended the for-profit Everest College, part of Corinthian Colleges Inc., in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 2010 to 2012, and he received an associate degree in network administration.

Three years later Adorno is unemployed and was even rejected from a job at Best Buy. Adorno belongs to a group called the Corinthian 100, alumni of Corinthian Colleges who refuse to pay back their student loans and claim they were defrauded by Corinthian. Like other members of the group, he claims he got a subpar education and was left with massive debt and no suitable job.

Before 2014, Corinthian Colleges Inc. was a network of more than 100 schools and one of the largest for-profit college companies in the U.S. But numerous investigations and lawsuits alleging wrongdoing against the company rapidly decreased its size. In July, an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education forced Corinthian to sell 85 of its schools and close another 12.

http://slate.me/1cTi5KI

Print Friendly
New_Alzheimer’s_treatment_fully_restores_memory_function_-_ScienceAlert

Alzheimers Cure – American Airlines Tablet Disaster – Feds Looking for Back Door – Show Notes

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

The team reports fully restoring the memory function of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue.

If a person has Alzheimer’s disease, it’s usually the result of a build-up of two types of lesions, and Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of both types.

The team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to activate. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps that are responsible for the worst symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

http://bit.ly/1AoZFH7

Third-party app crashed American Airlines pilots’ iPads and caused flight delays

Dozens of American Airlines flights were delayed on Tuesday after “a faulty iPad navigation app” caused the tablets to crash. Despite Boeing 737 pilots’ claims of all 737’s being grounded and a system-wide outage, American Airlines spokesperson Casey Norton said, “Initial reports on social media of a system-wide problem affecting a specific type of aircraft are inaccurate.” Instead, “several dozen” flights were affected by the outage.

In 2013, American Airlines was the first commercial carrier to deploy electronic flight bags and discontinue paper charts. At that time, more than 8,000 iPads were deployed to replace the 3,000-page, 35-pound paper-based manuals in the airline’s Boeing 777, 767, 757, 737 and MD-80. The change saved the airline “a minimum of 400,000 gallons and $1.2 million of fuel annually” and eliminated “24 million pages of paper documents.”

http://bit.ly/1zmnAvH

Feds trying to get a “Back Door” for encrypted communications. Irate Congressman gives cops easy rule: “Just follow the damn Constitution”

Apple expands data encryption under iOS 8, making handover to cops moot. “Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data.”

Despite the best efforts of law enforcement to convince a Congressional subcommittee that technology firms actually need to weaken encryption in order to serve the public interest, lawmakers were not having it.

Daniel Conley, the district attorney in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, testified Wednesday before the committee that companies like Apple and Google were helping criminals by hardening encryption on their smartphones.

Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA) said “It is clear to me that creating a pathway for decryption only for good guys is technologically stupid, you just can’t do that,” he said, underscoring that he found Conley’s remarks “offensive.”

http://bit.ly/1zCmrR4

Robbery suspect pulls guilty plea after stingray disclosure, case dropped.

“They won’t go to trial because they don’t want to explain this stuff, so they ended up dismissing it,” said the lead attorney involved in the case.

Stingrays, known more generically as cell-site simulators, are used by law enforcement agencies nationwide, although new documents have recently been released showing how they have been purchased and used in some limited instances. And cops have lied to courts about their use. Not only can stingrays be used to determine location by spoofing a cell tower, they can also be used to intercept calls and text messages. Typically, police deploy them without first obtaining a search warrant.

It is highly likely that the St. Louis Police Department has a non-disclosure agreement with the FBI along the lines of one recently revealed in a court case in Erie County, New York. In that case, a rare unredacted form demonstrated the full extent of the FBI’s attempt to quash public disclosure of stringray information. The most egregious example from the document showed that the FBI would prefer to drop a criminal case in order to protect secrecy surrounding the stingray.

http://bit.ly/1ELjjCr

Tesla’s Battery Could Power Utilities

Elon Musk had to resist the urge to strike a Dr. Evil pose Thursday night as he talked about “billions” of batteries like Tesla Motors TSLA -0.01 % ’ new Powerpack effectively ending the energy business as we know it.

Tesla may be taking a page from Apple’s book. Decades ago, Apple took a technically difficult tool used mainly by die-hards, the personal computer, and popularized it. In the same way, Tesla’s sleekly packaged take on distributed power is “talking to the 99% of people who think it can’t be done and making something people think can be done,” says Rob Day, partner at Black Coral Capital, a clean technology venture-capital fund.

http://on.wsj.com/1zCo2q8

See how old a computer thinks you are with Microsoft’s new website

Don’t waste the whole day on this, but Microsoft introduced How-Old.net, a website to guess how old you are, at today’s Microsoft conference this Friday.

How-Old.net isn’t highly accurate, but it’s close, and it’s getting better. It thinks Vin Diesel is 28 (actual age is 47) and Jennifer Lawrence is 29 (actual age 24). Vin must have better makeup 😉

http://bit.ly/1Je6LDo

Mobilegeddon has arrived!

From now on, mobile friendliness of websites is a ranking signal all over the world. This update affects all mobile search queries. So, we analyzed the winners and losers of this update for rankings on google.com.

Get the report at http://bit.ly/1Q9RIP4

Print Friendly
license_plate_tracker

License-Plate Tracking – Common Core Tests by a Yale Graduate – Under 30s Aren’t Starting Businesses

A year after firestorm, DHS wants access to license-plate tracking system

The Department of Homeland Security is seeking bids from companies able to provide law enforcement officials with access to a national license-plate tracking system — a year after canceling a similar solicitation over privacy issues.

How is it keeping information private? It won’t collect the data itself, it is seeking bids from companies that already gather the data to say how much they would charge to grant access to law enforcement officers at Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a DHS agency. “If this goes forward, DHS will have warrantless access to location information going back at least five years about virtually every adult driver in the U.S., and sometimes to their image as well,” said Gregory T. Nojeim, senior counsel for the Center for Democracy & Technology.

http://wapo.st/1GgJYUt

No More ‘Speeding’ For You!

Tomorrow, you may not be able to “speed” even if you wanted to.

Because your car will not allow you to.

The uber governor — Ford’s Intelligent Speed Limiter — will see to that.

It uses cameras and GPS mapping technology to keep track of the speed limit in real time — that is, as you drive — on whatever road you happen to be on at any given moment and — by dialing back the throttle — prevents the vehicle from exceeding it. Mash the pedal all you like. Resistance is futile.

http://bit.ly/1EAKS37

What happens when a Yale grad takes the 8th grade Common Core exam?

More than half of the sample exam had essay questions listed after the fiction and non-fiction passages that make up the content of the test . I was pleased with the specificity of the essay question instructions. As opposed to the multiple choice responses, the essays allowed for detailed and specific answers.

In the hour and three minutes I had available to take the test, I scored 22 points out of 25, or 88 percent. And that was the score of a grownup who reads for a living. Compare that to a child knowing that a lot is riding on the exam.

http://bit.ly/1EAPaaU

Why Aren’t Young People Starting Businesses Anymore?

According to the Federal Reserve Survey of Consumer Finances, the share of people under 35 who own a stake in private businesses has fallen from 10.2 percent in 1989 to 6.5 percent in 2013, the latest year data is available, and it is likely all the following reasons have played a part:

  • It has become more difficult to run a small business with various government entities pushing new regulations at entrepreneurs. Government regulations ranked as one of the biggest challenges facing small businesses in a recent survey of 1,000 small business owners.
  • Older people who have run businesses for years have learned to navigate the regulatory regime, but younger entrepreneurs struggle to jump through all the hoops required to start a business.
  • Would-be entrepreneurs are emerging from college with more debt than in the past, making it hard to get additional loans to start businesses.
  • Banks faced with higher costs and new regulations themselves are not willing to make as many small business loans as they did in the past.

http://dailysign.al/1FkOCoe

Smartmeters Being Used by California Water Authorities To Use New Tool In Fight Against Water Wasters

“It collects the data every five minutes, then after midnight, the cellphone that’s built in here comes on, makes one call, and calls it in to the database that we and the customer, through a password security system, have online access to their consumption.”

Using this data, the town knew the precise moment to send his employees to videotape the infractions to use as evidence.

“We are using it specifically for an enforcement tool to go after those customers who we’ve gotten lots of complaints about,” Wattier said.

http://cbsloc.al/1DIBX96

NYCLU releases details of EC Sheriff’s cell phone spying

Erie County Sheriff’s Office has been using taxpayer-funded cell phone spying equipment. The cell phone surveillance equipment is called the Stingray, which costs $350,000. It allows the sheriff’s office to track and record the location of a person through their cell phone.

Records show it has been used at least 47 times, but the sheriff’s office obtained a court order only once, even though the sheriff made statement to local media and the Erie County Legislature that each use of the device was subject to “judicial review.”

http://bit.ly/1PxvFla

How Long to Nap for the Biggest Brain Benefits

For a quick boost of alertness, experts say a 10-to-20-minute power nap is adequate for getting back to work in a pinch.

For cognitive memory processing, however, a 60-minute nap may do more good, Dr. Mednick said. Including slow-wave sleep helps with remembering facts, places and faces. The downside: some grogginess upon waking.

Finally, the 90-minute nap will likely involve a full cycle of sleep, which aids creativity and emotional and procedural memory, such as learning how to ride a bike. Waking up after REM sleep usually means a minimal amount of sleep inertia, Dr. Mednick said.

http://bit.ly/1OmqTd3

Print Friendly

Anthem Hack Exposes Millions of Children – Show Notes March 21, 2015

Millions of Children Exposed to ID Theft Through Anthem Breach

anthemfacts_com“Every terrible outcome that can occur as the result of an identity theft will happen to the children who were on that database,” said Adam Levin, chairman and founder of IDentityTheft 911. “Criminals will use those stolen Social Security numbers to open accounts, get medical treatment, commit tax fraud, you name it.”

The Social Security number was never supposed to be used as a national identifier, but it’s become that. For an identity thief, that nine-digit number is the brass ring. It’s the skeleton key that unlocks your life.

A child’s number is even more valuable. Here’s why: For most minors, their number is pristine – it’s never been used and is not yet associated with a credit file. That means there’s very little chance that the credit reporting agencies are monitoring it.

So a criminal can take that stolen number, combine it with someone else’s name, address and birth date to create a fake ID – what fraud fighters call a “synthetic ID” – that can be used for all sorts of fraudulent purposes.

http://nbcnews.to/1BuMvvN

How to Tell Which iPhone Apps Are Killing Your Battery.

Apple’s newest iPhone software, iOS 8, has made it easy to tell which apps are literally sucking the life out of your battery.

http://ti.me/1C91uvL

How Your USB Cables Are About to Change Forever

USB-C is faster, smaller and more flexible and Apple is the first to use it.

http://ti.me/1OhNPrj

The Life Extension Blog: Soda May Accelerate Aging

Researchers surveyed over 5,000 Americans between the ages of 20 to 65 years. They sampled healthy adults with no prior history of diabetes or heart disease. Soda Aged Cells by About Five Years. Telomeres, the end caps of DNA strands that serve as a marker for aging, were found to be shortened in people who drink just one can of soda a day.

http://bit.ly/1ECQcQ2

Microsoft is killing off the Internet Explorer brand

While Microsoft has dropped hints that the Internet Explorer brand is going away, the software maker has now confirmed that it will use a new name for its upcoming browser successor, codenamed Project Spartan.

Microsoft has tried, unsuccessfully, to shake off the negative image of Internet Explorer over the past several years with a series of amusing campaigns mocking Internet Explorer 6. The ads didn’t improve the situation, and Microsoft’s former Internet Explorer chief left the company in December, signalling a new era for the browser.

http://bit.ly/1ECRcnh

The Next Windows Is Coming Way Sooner Than We Thought

The next generation of Microsoft’s operating system, Windows 10, will launch as early as this summer. Microsoft will take the unprecedented step of making the upgrade available for free, even to “non-genuine” Windows users, an oblique reference to pirated versions of the operating system.

http://ti.me/1C96C2Z

GPS Jammers and Maritime Security Threats

Capt. Moskoff spoke of the danger of hostile actors using simple GPS-jamming devices, which are readily available from the Internet. Such “jammers” could “paralyze ship traffic and operations at U.S ports, and that would cause just one port an economic loss of $1 billion per day.”

Currently, North Korea is the world’s biggest jammer of GPS.

http://bit.ly/1Dsc4zO

Print Friendly