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Tax Return Breach – Miami and Pre-Crime – Highest Paying Engineering Jobs

IRS believes Russians are behind tax return data breach

The IRS believes that a major cyber breach that allowed criminals to steal the tax returns of more than 100,000 people originated in Russia, two sources briefed on the data theft tell CNN.

Between February and May, criminals tried to access the tax accounts of 200,000 people, succeeding in about half the attempts, the IRS said. The agency said it plans to notify all 200,000 people to tell them that third parties appear to have access to their Social Security numbers and other personal information.

The roughly 100,000 taxpayers whose tax information was accessed will be offered free credit monitoring, the agency said.

http://cnn.it/1SEf1mt

Not science fiction: Miami wants to predict when and where crime will occur

Armed with high-tech software and years of crime data, Miami police believe they will soon be able to stop crimes by predicting when and where they will occur. In Miami’s case, the department is funding the implementation of HunchLab and other software programs with a $600,000 federal grant doled out by the Bureau of Justice Assistance to encourage smart policing tactics.

It sounds a little like something out of a science fiction novel, but the department is in the process of adopting a system called HunchLab that produces maps showing small areas where specific crimes are likely to be committed during shifts. The probability program is a geographical version of “predictive policing” software, which more departments are using — even if, in the words of one supportive cop, it’s “kind of scary.”

http://hrld.us/1POlLPD

These are the Highest Paying Jobs for Engineering Majors

  • VP, Business Development: $151,000 with a basic Engineering degree.
  • Chief Architect, IT: Tie – $151,000 with an Electrical Engineering degree.
  • VP, Construction Management Operations: $134,000 with a Civil Engineering degree.
  • Sales Director: $125,000 with a Mechanical Engineering degree.
  • Network Architect: $119,000 with an Electrical Engineering degree.
  • Principal Electrical Engineer: $117,000 with an Electrical Engineering degree.

http://bit.ly/1RoLFH5

Is the internet on the brink of collapse?

In just 20 years, if usage rates continue, all of Britain’s power supply could be consumed by internet use.

The cables and fibre optics that send information to our laptops, smartphones and tablets will have reached their limit to send data within eight years, experts warn.

So far, engineers have managed to keep ahead of demand, increasing internet speeds 50-fold in the last decade alone. Until now, internet firms have simply sent more and more data down the single fibre as demand rises. But optical fibres have reached their physical capacity, they cannot transfer any more light.

http://dailym.ai/1POpjS7

Tesla’s $3,000 Powerwall Will Let Households Run Entirely On Solar Energy

The Tesla Powerwall charges using solar power, but it also integrates with the grid “to harness excess power and give customers the flexibility to draw energy from their own reserve.” The batteries recharge in a ‘smart’ way, saving money by picking low-rate periods when electricity is cheapest. They store solar
energy for later, for example overnight, and can act as a back-up in the event of a power outage.

Removing dirty energy is an ambitious plan — much like space travel — but Musk believes it can be done. He explained that 160 million battery packs could “transition” power usage in the U.S. to renewable energy, while 900 million units could shift the entire world’s energy needs. Then there is the potential to make the world’s cars run on clean energy.

http://tcrn.ch/1QaXoqj

This Tech Keeps You Safe From Hackers

But consumers can protect their own computers very easily by encrypting their data too. Windows users can use the BitLocker application to encrypt their drives, while Apple offers a program called FileVault2 to do the same thing on Macs. Still, with the Internet of Things promising to bring us lots more web-connected devices, this is only the beginning for encryption technologies. With millions if not billions more computing devices coming online — only some of which are encrypting their communications — a lot more data is in danger of being exposed.

http://ti.me/1QaXQEY

Five Best Streaming Music Services

Google Play Music, Spotify, Pandora, Amazon Prime Music, Rdio.

http://bit.ly/1GENa0M

Remember that study that showed that eating chocolate every day helped with weight loss?

It was all an elaborate hoax — an attempt to show how “Junk Science” really can perpetrate incredible myths that just aren’t true.

One premise? Testing bitter chocolate as a dietary supplement. Why? It is a favorite of the “whole food” fanatics. “Bitter chocolate tastes bad, therefore it must be good for you,” he said. “It’s like a religion.”

http://bit.ly/1d1EfdG

How Bad Bots Are Destroying The Internet

A quarter of the cars on the “Information Superhighway” with you are being driven by mindless bandits looking to steal anything they can.

Last year was the first time in history that bots outnumbered people on the web. According to research from Distil Networks, almost 60% of 2014’s web traffic consisted of automated bits of code, 23% of which exist to do dirty work for fraudsters and hackers. “It’s getting worse,” says Rami Essaid, Distil’s CEO. “Over the past ten years, they went from just kind of being out there and easy to detect to being really, really sophisticated.”

Meanwhile, T-Mobile, China Mobile, China Telecom, and China Unicom are being overrun by bad bots on the mobile web. This is a huge problem because there isn’t yet a lot of virus protection for mobile Internet devices, and last year there were more mobile than desktop web users for the first time in history. As a result, hackers are racing to exploit smartphones and tablets. In 2013, less than a percentage point of mobile traffic was bad bots. In 2014, that figure skyrocketed to between 6-8%. That’s a scary number because there are many more mobile devices than there are computers, so a vast majority of handhelds haven’t encountered a bot — yet.

http://ti.me/1SEevok

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Amazon Testing New Drones – New Limits on ISPs – Brain Implants Give Paralyzed Movement

Amazon Gets Permission to Test Drones

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has once again granted Amazon permission to test drones for commercial use, this time expediting the request. The FAA says Amazon can test drones for delivery as long as it limits altitude to 400 feet and speed to 100 miles per hour. Eventually, the web retailer hopes to use commercial drones to deliver packages to customers at a distance of 10 miles or more.

http://ti.me/1cTeCMe

Test shows if your ISP is throttling Internet speed

New regulations should stop ISPs from throttling your Internet, but has your ISP complied?

http://tnw.co/1PCWXKm

FCC Prepares to Become the Internet’s Privacy Cop

The agency issued an “enforcement advisory” Wednesday, outlining for the first time how it plans to decide whether to crack down on a company for violating its customers’ privacy. But the statement offers few specifics, leading critics to warn that the agency is claiming expansive new regulatory powers.

In order to enact net neutrality rules that it believed could hold up in court, the FCC expanded its power over Internet service by classifying it under the same regulatory regime as landline telephones.

That classification comes with dozens of regulations that have little to do with net neutrality. While the FCC waived most of those requirements for Internet providers, one section that will apply is the agency’s privacy protections.

http://bit.ly/1PCXs7a

Brain implants control robot arm well enough to grab a beer

A paralyzed man named Erik Sorto has finally been able to drink beer on his own after 13 years, and it’s all thanks to a robotic arm controlled solely by his mind.

Other mind-controlled robot limbs usually target the brain region that controls muscles, but the PPC is in charge of our “intent to move” instead. This apparently allows Caltech’s creation to move more fluidly and naturally, unlike the movements of similar technologies, which are (according to the team) “delayed and jerky.” In order to control the arm, Sorto has to think of what he intends to do, instead of imagining the details of a particular action. He has to think that he “wants to shake another person’s hand,” for instance, whereas other systems might require him to imagine each step: lift forearm, extend, grasp other person’s hand, lift up, down, up, down.

http://engt.co/1KqL4np

Doctors Say Tick Borne ‘Powassan Virus’ Is Worse Than Lyme Disease

It’s even worse than Lyme disease. Ticks in New York have been found to carry a rare, potentially life-threatening, virus.

http://cbsloc.al/1JJRvR6

OldNYC – Mapping historical pictures of New York City

New York City photos are now being currated online and organized by location and time. Take a walk down the old city streets.

http://bit.ly/1cblhR0

How the government just protected some of your favorite podcasts

The company that owns the patent in question, Personal Audio, says it invented podcasting. In 2013, it began going around to podcast-makers, threatening to take them to court unless they paid a licensing fee. Among those affected? TV personality and comedian Adam Carolla, who ultimately settled with Personal Audio but not before spending more than $650,000 defending himself.

If you’ve heard about this case or others like it, then you’re familiar with patent trolls. They are companies that own patents but don’t really use them to make anything, except lawsuits. Pretty much everyone agrees they’re a horrible drain on innovation and the economy; the Federal Trade Commission gave a slap on the wrist to one last year, and Congress is currently debating how to reduce their impact.

Friday’s ruling by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office invalidates five provisions of Personal Audio’s podcasting patent.

http://wapo.st/1HoIPKZ

The Most Creative Applications of 3D Printing

Beyond its recreational use, this promising technology already has very innovative and creative applications in fields as diverse as health, space exploration, education or art.

NASA plans to send 3D printers to space to allow astronauts to manufacture the parts they need.

For biology classes in high schools, or even for faculties of medicine, one can now print replicas of human body parts that help in their study. 3D printing may also be applied in the study of art or of human evolution. It is already possible to take a replica of Michelangelo’s David to the classroom to analyse, draw or manipulate.

http://bit.ly/1cTgh4r

Possible cure for Melanoma?

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. Among the various types of skin cancer, melanoma is the most severe. Melanoma develops in the cells of the skin that produce melanin, which is the pigment that gives skin its color. It accounts for over 76 percent of cancer deaths each year. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2015, about 73,870 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the United States.

So, what are the researchers in Utah doing? They are customizing mutated viruses and injecting them directly into melanoma tumors to “train” them to attack cancer cells. What’s unique about this study
though, is that they are not just taking any virus, but the herpes virus, and altering the way it works.

http://fxn.ws/1F7Lng2

Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away

Like fingerprints, every iris is unique — thanks to enormously complex patterns that remain the same throughout a person’s lifetime. High-resolution cameras can capture images of the iris from a distance using light in the near-infrared wavelength band.

In the realm of law enforcement, iris recognition could be used to identify suspects at long range in various lighting conditions. The system can even be used to capture images through reflections in a mirror.

http://bit.ly/1F7LEQa

Computer Scientist Gives Virginia Voting Machines F- Security Grade

The electronic voting machines were shown to fail in every category: firmware, software, physical security and auditability.

http://bit.ly/1JK0MZu

This Guy Couldn’t Get a Job at Best Buy, so He’s Refusing to Pay Back His For-Profit College Loans

At 28, Michael Adorno got fed up with his low-wage job at a pizzeria in Richmond Hill, Georgia, and decided to go to college. Adorno attended the for-profit Everest College, part of Corinthian Colleges Inc., in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 2010 to 2012, and he received an associate degree in network administration.

Three years later Adorno is unemployed and was even rejected from a job at Best Buy. Adorno belongs to a group called the Corinthian 100, alumni of Corinthian Colleges who refuse to pay back their student loans and claim they were defrauded by Corinthian. Like other members of the group, he claims he got a subpar education and was left with massive debt and no suitable job.

Before 2014, Corinthian Colleges Inc. was a network of more than 100 schools and one of the largest for-profit college companies in the U.S. But numerous investigations and lawsuits alleging wrongdoing against the company rapidly decreased its size. In July, an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education forced Corinthian to sell 85 of its schools and close another 12.

http://slate.me/1cTi5KI

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Autonomous Truck – Microsoft Ditching Internet Explorer – Perfect Remote Working Setup

Autonomous Truck Crosses Hoover Dam

Automaker Daimler introduced an autonomous truck on Tuesday night. The company says a driver must be present, but that driver has the option to relinquish control to the vehicle.

http://wapo.st/1GUCo20

Microsoft is tossing Internet Explorer this fall. Is its replacement any better?

Well, the good news is, this browser isn’t Internet Explorer. If you’re a hardcore Chrome or Firefox user with a half dozen extensions, you probably won’t be tempted away immediately. For now, though, it does look promising. Microsoft is making an effort to add genuinely useful features to a browser that’s shedding its worst parts and starting over on a solid foundation.

http://bit.ly/1H4Gpni

Anti-Kardashian Pollution App

Tired of Kim Kardashian trying to break the Internet? Then break free of any Kardashian-related news with KardBlock, a new app that erases any mention of the family famous for being famous from your web browsing experience.

“If there’s anything on your newsfeed, the website you’re on, whatever, we simply make it disappear,” developer James Shamsi explains in a beta launch for the AdBlock program created to erase the Kardashians. “You won’t ever know the stories about the Kardashians are there, because you won’t ever see them.”

http://bit.ly/1JVjNJA

Paying for Social Is Better Than ‘Doing’ Social Media Yourself

Social networks are showing signs of decreased reach. None losing more rapidly than Facebook. There are two widely cited reasons for it: 1) Social media sites want to encourage businesses to pay them money for the value they now get for free; and 2) As more people and businesses post to social media more often, everyone gets less attention, so supply and demand push reach down and rates up.

http://bit.ly/1PvQxHA

NSA’s Bulk Collection Of Americans’ Phone Data Is Illegal, Appeals Court Rules

The National Security Agency’s practice of collecting data about Americans’ telephone calls in bulk goes beyond what Congress intended when it wrote Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel punted on the constitutional claim, deciding the program was simply not authorized by federal law.

One of the big reasons it is hard to discern congressional intent in this case, the court wrote, is that the bulk collection program has been shrouded in secrecy. So it cannot “reasonably be said” that Congress OK’d “a program of which many members of Congress — and all members of the public — were not aware.”

http://n.pr/1EW77xB

How to Find the Perfect Remote Working Setup for You

Remote working doesn’t suit everyone, but for those who do love the extra flexibility and autonomy, here is the where, when, why, and how of finding your perfect remote working setup.

http://bit.ly/1H7IbGR

Recruiting for “digital natives” is age discrimination, lawyers say.

How do you recruit for youthful workers? How about just recruiting for “digital natives”?

“Young people are just smarter,” Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, famously said on a conference stage in 2007 when he was 22. In 2013, Facebook settled a lawsuit with California’s Fair Employment and Housing Department for posting an employment ad that stated “Class of 2007 or 2008 preferred.”

Apple, Yahoo, Dropbox, and video game maker Electronic Arts all have listed openings with “new grad” as a preference.

http://for.tn/1FaT3Ub

FCC Commissioner: Feds May Come for Drudge

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) member Ajit Pai said over the weekend that he foresees a future in which federal regulators will seek to regulate websites based on political content, using the power of the FCC or Federal Elections Commission (FEC). He also revealed that his opposition to “net neutrality” regulations had resulted in personal harassment and threats to his family.

“It is conceivable to me to see the government saying, ‘We think the Drudge Report is having a disproportionate effect on our political discourse. He doesn’t have to file anything with the FEC. The FCC doesn’t have the ability to regulate anything he says, and we want to start tamping down on websites like that.’”

http://bit.ly/1JVlx5t

Apple to Push Paid Streaming Music Service With Free Trials and SoundCloud-Like Sharing

Ahead of the rumored debut of Apple’s upcoming streaming music service, Re/code has shared several details on the initiative, sourced from industry insiders. As we’ve learned previously, Apple will charge $9.99 per month for the service and will not offer a freemium streaming tier as other music services like Spotify do, but the company is aiming to introduce ways to let people listen to come content for free. First and foremost, Apple hopes to offer listeners a free trial period

http://bit.ly/1cxpKP7

Pizza Hut App anyone? Woman held hostage asks for help in online pizza order

A quick-thinking Highlands County woman saved herself and her children from possible harm when she ordered an online pizza with a secret message saying she was being held hostage.

“We’ve never seen that before,” the restaurant’s manager, Candy Hamilton, said. “I’ve been here 28 years and never, never seen nothing like that come through.”

http://bit.ly/1FUMynb

Mobile Search Queries Start to Surpass Desktop: Here’s What You Can Do About It

Now that mobile search queries have surpassed desktop queries, the business implication of the mobile algorithm update has become that much clearer: If you’re still thinking of mobile as a secondary priority, your business’ online presence will start to suffer. As Dischler says, “The future of mobile is now.”

http://bit.ly/1F4Tqh7

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Alzheimers Cure – American Airlines Tablet Disaster – Feds Looking for Back Door – Show Notes

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

The team reports fully restoring the memory function of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue.

If a person has Alzheimer’s disease, it’s usually the result of a build-up of two types of lesions, and Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of both types.

The team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to activate. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps that are responsible for the worst symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

http://bit.ly/1AoZFH7

Third-party app crashed American Airlines pilots’ iPads and caused flight delays

Dozens of American Airlines flights were delayed on Tuesday after “a faulty iPad navigation app” caused the tablets to crash. Despite Boeing 737 pilots’ claims of all 737’s being grounded and a system-wide outage, American Airlines spokesperson Casey Norton said, “Initial reports on social media of a system-wide problem affecting a specific type of aircraft are inaccurate.” Instead, “several dozen” flights were affected by the outage.

In 2013, American Airlines was the first commercial carrier to deploy electronic flight bags and discontinue paper charts. At that time, more than 8,000 iPads were deployed to replace the 3,000-page, 35-pound paper-based manuals in the airline’s Boeing 777, 767, 757, 737 and MD-80. The change saved the airline “a minimum of 400,000 gallons and $1.2 million of fuel annually” and eliminated “24 million pages of paper documents.”

http://bit.ly/1zmnAvH

Feds trying to get a “Back Door” for encrypted communications. Irate Congressman gives cops easy rule: “Just follow the damn Constitution”

Apple expands data encryption under iOS 8, making handover to cops moot. “Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data.”

Despite the best efforts of law enforcement to convince a Congressional subcommittee that technology firms actually need to weaken encryption in order to serve the public interest, lawmakers were not having it.

Daniel Conley, the district attorney in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, testified Wednesday before the committee that companies like Apple and Google were helping criminals by hardening encryption on their smartphones.

Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA) said “It is clear to me that creating a pathway for decryption only for good guys is technologically stupid, you just can’t do that,” he said, underscoring that he found Conley’s remarks “offensive.”

http://bit.ly/1zCmrR4

Robbery suspect pulls guilty plea after stingray disclosure, case dropped.

“They won’t go to trial because they don’t want to explain this stuff, so they ended up dismissing it,” said the lead attorney involved in the case.

Stingrays, known more generically as cell-site simulators, are used by law enforcement agencies nationwide, although new documents have recently been released showing how they have been purchased and used in some limited instances. And cops have lied to courts about their use. Not only can stingrays be used to determine location by spoofing a cell tower, they can also be used to intercept calls and text messages. Typically, police deploy them without first obtaining a search warrant.

It is highly likely that the St. Louis Police Department has a non-disclosure agreement with the FBI along the lines of one recently revealed in a court case in Erie County, New York. In that case, a rare unredacted form demonstrated the full extent of the FBI’s attempt to quash public disclosure of stringray information. The most egregious example from the document showed that the FBI would prefer to drop a criminal case in order to protect secrecy surrounding the stingray.

http://bit.ly/1ELjjCr

Tesla’s Battery Could Power Utilities

Elon Musk had to resist the urge to strike a Dr. Evil pose Thursday night as he talked about “billions” of batteries like Tesla Motors TSLA -0.01 % ’ new Powerpack effectively ending the energy business as we know it.

Tesla may be taking a page from Apple’s book. Decades ago, Apple took a technically difficult tool used mainly by die-hards, the personal computer, and popularized it. In the same way, Tesla’s sleekly packaged take on distributed power is “talking to the 99% of people who think it can’t be done and making something people think can be done,” says Rob Day, partner at Black Coral Capital, a clean technology venture-capital fund.

http://on.wsj.com/1zCo2q8

See how old a computer thinks you are with Microsoft’s new website

Don’t waste the whole day on this, but Microsoft introduced How-Old.net, a website to guess how old you are, at today’s Microsoft conference this Friday.

How-Old.net isn’t highly accurate, but it’s close, and it’s getting better. It thinks Vin Diesel is 28 (actual age is 47) and Jennifer Lawrence is 29 (actual age 24). Vin must have better makeup 😉

http://bit.ly/1Je6LDo

Mobilegeddon has arrived!

From now on, mobile friendliness of websites is a ranking signal all over the world. This update affects all mobile search queries. So, we analyzed the winners and losers of this update for rankings on google.com.

Get the report at http://bit.ly/1Q9RIP4

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Self-Driving Car Completes Cross-Country Trip, USASpending.Gov looses Transparency

Self-driving SUV completes cross-country trip

Delphi_Audi_First_Autonomous_Car_to_Drive_United_States

Delphi, Audi – First Autonomous Car to Drive United States

The Delphi Automotive autonomous SUV arrived in New York this week after the 3,500 mile journey – the longest autonomous drive ever. The car, like many on the market, is equipped with GPS and a collection of sensors and cameras, but it goes beyond average in its reliance on those technologies to steer through traffic and brake on its own. The trip started in San Francisco near the Golden Gate Bridge.

During the trip, the car always had a human behind the wheel.

http://cbsn.ws/1xEqzij

Obama Admin’s New Spending Website Rolls Back Transparency

Data previously available at click of a button now a needle in a haystack. Usaspending.gov, a website mandated by law to provide detailed information on every federal contract over $3,000, received a makeover on Tuesday. Users can no longer search federal spending by keywords, sort contracts by date, or easily find detailed information on awards, which are delivered in bulk.

http://bit.ly/1MPioq

It doesn’t matter how much Apple’s TV service costs because cable is so bad people will sign up anyway

Modern cable systems are awful: You have to use a beat up old DVR box that’s been used by who-knows-how-many people before you. (And then when it inevitably fizzles out, you have to schedule an appointment to get it swapped.) You have to slog through confusing, unresponsive menus. You have to use a remote with more buttons and options than the cockpit of a 747.

And you pay $50 or $60 or $70 per month for that experience, plus the equipment rental fees.

Apple TV as your hub. You won’t have to worry about switching inputs because you’ll have one box and one remote that controls everything. And if you decide you want to watch something on the go, you could stream it to your iPhone, iPad, or Mac instead.

http://read.bi/1C10QwP

What is the Apple Watch actually for?

The Apple Watch goes on sale in a few weeks: 24 April. It’s the latest release from the company that created gadgets that we didn’t know we had to have, like the iPod and iPad.

The Apple Watch is a convenient, deeply personal way to access notifications such as text messages, emails or social networking updates. It also offers access to a wealth of apps from mapping to health monitors.

Hold on, doesn’t my smartphone do all that?

Pretty much, and you’ll need an iPhone nearby to make the most of the Watch, since it piggy-backs off the phone’s internet access and so on.

http://ind.pn/1HwpBEN

Parents cleaning with bleach might be doing more harm than good

Researchers say they have discovered a link between the weekly use of bleach at home and the frequency of infections in children, particularly of a respiratory nature.

While bleach is effective in killing germs, the chemical may leave children more susceptible to catching flu, tonsillitis or other infections.

Exposure to bleach was associated with a 20 per cent increase in the risk of flu and a 35 per cent rise in the risk of recurrent tonsillitis.

http://ind.pn/1HwqXj1

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